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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
LINKTV
Nov 14, 2012 7:30pm PST
/73 that opened up in a sense china to the u.s. they saw it as opening china outward to the broader world and it intrigued me and i said this is going to be big and we need more people to know what's going on between our two societies. >> absolutely and as we are - you were here in the first part of the class and of course where we are in beliefs and believers is we're coming to the end of looking at what we call here and we've had a chance to look at them. but, just from your perspective, how close are we in saying tt in confucianism and taoism it cuts to the core of the family? i think susanna raised a question about the priorities but, how so this family relationships? >> family is at the core, family is the principle metaphor for the whole culture. and even in that little take at the very end he said you take it home and cook it for you family, right? so whatever happens the final sort of reference point is the family. that all relationships are based on family relationships; the father/son, the husband/wife, the brother/brother, are the working-outs. i mean, this comes from our
LINKTV
Nov 27, 2012 11:30am PST
for $10,000. the painting was hung in the u.s. capitol, a triumph for moran. soon after, he began signing his work with the monogram "t.y.m." for thomas "yellowsto" moran. yellowstone remained a source of inspiration throughout moran's career. in 1892, the artist returned to the park to create new paintings of its wonders. by this time, yellowstone was a popular tourist attraction. the idea of the national park, suggested two decades before, had been fully realized. moran's depictions of yellowstone left a permanent mark on the american consciousness, transforming the public perception of the west fr a frightful land of mystery into a patriotic symbol of the beauty and promise of america. ( music )
LINKTV
Nov 28, 2012 7:30pm PST
can happen in the u.s. >> you are right. what's the name of that fault? >> the new madrid fault, it runs through southern illinois and into missouri. and - there is the possibility >> of course there is a possibility. there is also a possibility that when the millennium comes we are all going to blow up. >> there are more possibilities that there is going to be an earthquake on the new madrid fault, due to geological fact, that's my point. >> this will show you how it can happen. i live in a slab house, concrete one floor. i was in the family room ironing and i was hanging up a shirt and the iron started going like this and i said whatever you kids are doing up there cut it out. i didn't realize - it's a first time i experienced a tremor, and it was right in park forest. so it did happen and it's happened since. >> well speaking of faults i'm at an incredible fault here for not getting to the roll-in on sects and cults. so, but you're right, you're exactly right about the power of media and the history of ideas. i'll leave you out lauren, because we are going to get you in. but let
LINKTV
Nov 27, 2012 7:30pm PST
will come up. if you say "nick nolte" they say, "nick's numbers are good in the u.s., but they're weak foreign." it's always part of the conversation. and because we never had a national cinema we never thought in national terms that way. and we managed to use all that huge american merchandising and power and confidence to sell this to the world. and now, when any filmmaker becomes successful and wants to make international movies he comes to los angeles. so it doesn't really matter whether it's konchalavsky or peter weir or bertolucci... or victor babencko. or luis llosa, the new peruvian filmmaker who did the new sylvester stallone... the specialist. specialist movie. he now is an american director because he came to hollywood and did a sylvester stallone movie. so if you want to make an international movie you come to hollywood. he is no longer peruvian or american. he's hollywood. insdorf: there is a reason that, for example, the hollywood style in the various ways that we've been chipping at the notion... there's a reason that it's had such an enduring appeal such a geograph
LINKTV
Nov 15, 2012 11:30am PST
extremely urbanid and mobile population. in the u.s., many urban areas are characterized by diverse cultures, which create a rich ethnic mosaic. oufocus is boston, massachuse, part of a megalopolis located on the northeastern seaboa othe iteds. macaciopulio part of a megalopolis locahave taken root in older seainner-city neighborhoods. in recent decades, these neighborhoods deteriorated, with a downward spiral in infrastructure, services and opportunities. bunow stons bouncing back. with a downward spiral we'll see how relative location to the central business district, or cbd, is important to the development of these neighborhoods-- how so much can ride on their being part of federally-funded enterprise zones and how geographic information systems, or gis, can be used in addressing some difficult urban economic and social issues. boston, massachusetts. once a great port, it's now a world leader in high tech, higher education, bmedicine and finance. but like most u.s. cities, boston lost many jobs and middle-class residents to the suburbs. it's a regional problem-- part of the widen
LINKTV
Nov 1, 2012 7:30pm PDT
up here the whole time. we've got about a minute, unfortunately. >> u.s. news and world report for july 20th lists you as the most influential muslim leader- black, white, or asian. with that kind of leadership, do you expect louis farrakhan to begin to modify his stance, and if so, in what specific areas? >> well, let me say first that most of farrakhan's people and those that he attracts, they don't believe what the u.s. news and world report says. [laughter] >> hey, take it if you get it, right? >> but i do know that minister farrakhan- now i'll share this with you too. we used to be very good friends- i used to go to his home and he used to play violin; we used to laugh and joke and talk. i enjoyed his family, he enjoyed my family. so when we separated, we lost something, we missed something, and we still miss something- we miss this personal friendship we used to have. so he is really watching every step i make, and believe me, i am influencing what he's doing- in a good way, in a positive way. >> well, maybe he will be, but for now, we've run out of time. i want to thank you
LINKTV
Nov 8, 2012 11:30am PST
t wioth the european union and the u.s. gwynne: so it would have a double advantage. it would be easier r resource exports and agro-industrial products, products with value added, to go from chile to the united states and for the united states to respond with increasing sales of machinery and capital goods in the high-technology sectors. so there should be significant advantages for the north american free-trade area to be extended to other countries, and particularly chile. remember, chile is the most free-trading country the whole of soer h vy low tariffs, virtually no non-tariff barriers, so it would be relatively easy for the united states to extend these links. ator chile willontit like mancoies spond states porces oflobalization,xpory. there wichanges and settlement patterns.luds captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org annenberg media ♪ for information about this and other annenberg media programs call 1-800-learner and visit us at www.learner.org.
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)